What is a tree line?

Trees do not grow in the northern regions of Norway.

A tree line or woodline is the line at which trees stop growing. The best known include alpine, polar, desert and exhibition tree lines, although there are others. In the mountains, this point starts anywhere between 2,600 feet (800 m) and 17,000 feet (5,200 m) above sea level, although between 7,000 feet (2,100 m) and 10,000 feet (3,000 m) is most typical. The lowest alpine tree lines are in places where it is already very cold and difficult for trees to grow, such as northern Sweden and Norway, and the highest is in the Bolivian Andes, where hardy trees grow up to 5,200 m above sea level. from the sea.

In Eurasia, the tree line varies between 66 and 72 degrees north, meaning that only the northern tips of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia have one.

A combination of complex factors determines the altitude of the alpine tree line. This includes ambient temperature, local species and degree of exposure. Many mountains have lower wooden lines on south-facing slopes because they receive less sun and are therefore cooler and less hospitable. Usually, the trees that reach the highest altitudes are conifers, especially several species of pine, as they adapt better to the cold. Although alpine forests can host a variety of animal species, biodiversity tends to drop above the tree line, due to a lack of food and places to hide from predators. Some animals actually live at that altitude, eating small bushes. This includes the mountain goat, alpine ibex, bighorn sheep and various rodents and birds, including the golden eagle.

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The tree line refers to the line at which the trees stop growing.

Arctic and Antarctic tree lines occur in areas that are too far north or south to have suitable terrain for tree growth. This is usually around 70 degrees from the poles, but it can be as close as 52 degrees from the poles, depending on the weather. In Eurasia, the tree line varies between 66 and 72 degrees north, meaning that only the northern tips of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia have one. The northernmost forest line in the Arctic is in the Central Siberian Plateau, where the influence of an extreme continental climate warms the soil, and the southernmost is in Quebec, where the extremely cold Hudson Bay discourages tree growth. Few landmasses reach the southern end, making it difficult to delineate the tree line of Antarctica. Most of the southernmost areas of Tierra del Fuego in South America are arid,

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